Règles, stratégies et contrats dans la problématique du foncier : théorie et pratiques à travers quelques terrains au Maghreb, en Afrique noire et à Madagascar





télécharger 119.95 Kb.
titreRègles, stratégies et contrats dans la problématique du foncier : théorie et pratiques à travers quelques terrains au Maghreb, en Afrique noire et à Madagascar
page1/4
date de publication06.06.2019
taille119.95 Kb.
typeDocumentos
e.20-bal.com > loi > Documentos
  1   2   3   4



Règles, stratégies et contrats dans la problématique du foncier : théorie et pratiques à travers quelques terrains au Maghreb, en Afrique noire et à Madagascar

Alain Karsenty

Paru dans Christoph Eberhard (dir.), Enjeux fonciers et environnementaux. Dialogues afro-indiens, Pondichery, Institut Français de Pondichéry, 2007, 549 p (129-155)
Abstract : Rules, Strategies and Contracts in the Field of Land Law: A Reflexion on Theory and Practices through Field Works in Maghreb, Black Africa and Madagascar.

The aim of this paper, written by an economist, is to provide an interdisciplinary perspective on selected land tenure issues in the African continent. During the 1980s, land tenure issues were considered as one of the main stumbling blocks for the promotion of rural development, and have thus become a matter of new interest for rural economists, especially for ‘new institutional economists’, who emphasize the role of institutions in minimising transaction costs. The cases presented in this text show that, although such a conceptual framework provides a useful key for analysis, the researcher is still confronted with the risk of ‘over-interpreting’ the social practices so that they correspond with the theory used as the interpretative framework. Such an intellectual bias was already observed and conceptualised by Bourdieu in the 1970s, but it is still recurrent in social science fieldwork.

The first case study deals with ‘collective lands’ in north-west Morocco. The absence of individual land ownership was seen as a key feature of so-called ‘local communities’, which were supposed to be ruled by a collective land tenure system. The periodic (generally on an annual basis) re-allocation of fields among shareholders seemed to be, for many social scientists, one of the main characteristics of such lands. It was explained as a means to avoid the risk of overly pronounced social differences within the local group. This point has also sometimes been highlighted to ‘explain’ African behaviour concerning low investment and accumulation (in-)ability. Fieldwork coupled with historical inquiries has shown that egalitarian and recurrent land redistribution had been instituted by administrators during the French Protectorate. This redistribution was based on biased and selective observations made by colonial jurists in the early twentieth century, and was perpetuated for political objectives until after independence. Such ‘invention of tradition’ illustrates the risk of confusion between the intellectual pattern, developed to give an understanding of the practices, and the practices themselves, which follow their own specific dynamics. It also underscores the fact that what is presented to the external observer as ‘rules’ is subject to many exceptions that sometimes reveal more about the social dynamics of the local society than about the ‘traditional rule’ considered as immoveable.

A well-known conceptual framework derived from the public choice theory distinguishes between private, public, ‘club/toll’ and ‘common’ goods, and suggests that the intrinsic characteristic of the goods should be the basis for designing its property and management regime. Such a framework is not fully suitable for analysing land tenure in Africa, since the land is often characterised by several layers of tenure, the features of which can vary with time and according to the identity of the holder. The role of collective representations is critical here in order to assess what is acceptable or not, beyond the hypothesis of the ‘intrinsic nature’ of the land, and also to evaluate the choices made by societies regarding what should be private and what should be common or public. In addition, the nature of the tenure itself cannot be assessed without a comprehensive view of what is at stake among actors in the field and vis-à-vis the government. The ‘Rural Land Tenure Plan’, supported by foreign donors and tentatively implemented in certain West African countries, was designed to ‘record the local rights’ as they were declared by stakeholders. But the process failed to capture the real nature of the land rights because the technicians in charge of the operation were unable to elaborate tenure categories that would have been able to reflect the diversity of the local situations. Thus, the operation, far from providing a neutral picture of the land tenure situations, produced a new layer of interpretation of the local realities which, in its turn, will be appropriated and used in the individual strategies of local actors.

One of the shortcomings of the new institutional economics is its tendency to see the evolution of institutions through the exclusive prism of the minimisation of the transaction costs to achieve economic efficiency. Boserup’s theory linking agricultural intensification, enclosure and demographic growth can be read as a verification of such a narrative of ‘the emergence of institutions according to historical necessity’. Studies carried out in northern Burkina Faso, where demographic growth has been accompanied by ‘extensification’ and by natural resource degradation, suggest a less straightforward picture. Socio-economic evolution has led to individualism, and the will to avoid social conflicts within the different parts of the population motivated the upholding of land access rules and the blocking of possibilities of intensification.

A comparable analysis can be made regarding agrarian contracts in Madagascar. According to the literature influenced by new institutional economics, the choice of a given type of contract (land lease, sharecropping, etc.) was directly determined by market failures and risk aversion, and the persistence of sharecropping in many developing countries was typical of hazardous contexts, with priority given to economic security over efficiency. Madagascar, an island frequently crossed by hurricanes, would have been typical of such a situation. However, a field study showed how peasants managed to remove the risk entailed in annual payment associated with land lease thanks to their social capital and the common acquaintance between landlords and tenants. Here, too, economics is embedded in social relations and practices. Thus, the theory seems to be more effective in categorizing and explaining the rationale behind the choice of contract a posteriori, than in predicting the contract pattern one will find in the field.

INTRODUCTION

Le texte qui suit reflète les tribulations d’un économiste dans le domaine des études foncières dans les pays en développement au cours des deux décennies 1980 et 1990, domaine plus souvent occupé par les juristes, les sociologues et les anthropologues que par les économistes. Son propos n’est pas de mettre en avant une discipline par rapport aux autres, mais au contraire de montrer ce qu’une perspective interdisciplinaire est susceptible d’apporter pour l’analyse de ces questions ; et il représente l’occasion de rendre hommage à quelques-uns des auteurs dont les analyses ont aidé à éviter les embûches du réductionnisme qui jalonnent le sentier des recherches sur le foncier.

Une mise en perspective préalable du paysage intellectuel de ces deux décennies n’est pas inutile pour éclairer le contexte des questions successives posées au « terrain ». Alors que les années 1970 avaient été marquées par les différentes version du structuralisme, marxisant ou non, et notamment, en France, par les travaux d’anthropologie structurale de Levis-Strauss et Godelier, les années 1980 voient le « retour de l’acteur », et l’individualisme méthodologique devient pour beaucoup de chercheurs en sciences sociales, une référence obligée. Depuis H. Simons, on parle maintenant de « rationalité » au pluriel, de « rationalité procédurale » aux côtés de la « rationalité substantielle » (Simons, 1982), ce qui va permettre de donner leurs lettres de noblesse au travail de terrain et au « point de vue de l’acteur », clé probable de la compréhension des écarts entre les objectifs et les résultats des projets de développement. C’est l’occasion pour certains sujets de sortir de l’ombre : les questions foncières, notamment, deviennent des thèmes importants dans l’optique du développement rural, comme « facteur de blocage » dans les efforts pour promouvoir l’intensification agricole. La montée en puissance de l’économie néo-institutionnelle, va apporter un ensemble de concepts susceptibles de faire intervenir les économistes sur un thème (le foncier) qui était jusque là pratiquement le seul apanage des juristes. Le rôle des institutions dans la minimisation des coûts de transaction, dans la volonté des agents de se prémunir contre le risque, le « hasard moral » dans des situations d’asymétrie d’information devient un objet d’études privilégié par un grand nombre d’économistes confrontés à la singularité des situations de terrain et au peu de secours de la théorie économique standard, qui suppose une information parfaite et sans coût d’acquisition, et donc ignore les coûts de transaction.

Les « terres collectives » marocaines, une réinvention très politique de la tradition

Le discours conforme à la « règle »

Mes recherches des années 1980 ont eu trait aux structures foncières au Maroc, avec un objet d’étude précis, le bled jmaâ (« terres collectives ») dans la région du Gharb1. Dans une première expérience de recherche menée dans le cadre d’un Projet d’étude pour un (riche) Office de mise en valeur agricole (Structures agraires et développement) la question implicite était « Pourquoi les schémas modernes d’aménagement hydrauliques ne fonctionnent pas avec certains paysans ? »). Elle permettait d’alterner l’enquête de terrain, la recherche historique sur archives et documents, et le travail pluridisciplinaire (dialogue avec des juristes sur le foncier). À cette occasion, on découvre les « discours à destination des observateurs extérieurs » que savent tenir les ruraux, le discours que les enquêteurs souhaitent entendre, qui révèle des cohérences et masque les exceptions, montre l’observance des règles communautaires et pas les déviances. Puis, vertu des après-midi qui s’étirent sur le terrain, on comprend que les « allégeances multiples »2 sont la marque de la vie sociale quotidienne. On voit également que les « exceptions » (dans l’accès à la terre, dans l’héritage…) sont presque aussi nombreuses que les « règles appliquées » et on sent se dérober sous soi l’objet de son étude… Marx est de peu de recours, malgré ses analyses subtiles sur la Zadrouga slave et sur la communauté comme médiation nécessaire entre l’individu et la terre3.

Il y avait des faits troublants, relevés dès les années 1920, mais oubliés ensuite, comme le fait que les villages qui avaient servi de « marqueurs » pour la vérification de la thèse de la propriété collective et de ses partages réguliers et égalitaires des terres, se situaient aux abords d’oueds … qui submergeaient régulièrement le terroir villageois et effaçaient les limites de champs. Ce qui rendait, pour des raisons pratiques, assez probables les partages réguliers « à la corde » et le tirage au sol ultérieur des parcelles4. Puis c’est l’administration qui se chargea elle-même, à partir de la fin des années 50, d’effectuer les partages, égalitaires comme il convient pour des « collectivistes » (terme administratif couramment usité au Maroc pour désigner les paysans des « terres collectives »).

En parallèle, les consultations d’archives font apparaître un objet historiquement constitué, où l’anachronisme des juristes a rencontré les objectifs politiques d’une fraction du Protectorat, traduits dans le « conservationisme » subtil du Bureau des Affaires Indigènes qui deviendra « Service des Collectivités Rurales », relayés plus tard par la force impressionnante des routines administratives5. On lit quelques remarques acides de Jacques Berque, qui fut un ancien contrôleur civil du fameux Bureau, affecté à Had-Kourt (Gharb), sur les « prétendues terres collectives du Gharb » et ce jugement lapidaire « On croyait trouver l’Oriental là où il n’y avait qu’un paysan » (Berque 1938).

La construction d’un « référent-type »

Puis c’est la lecture des travaux d’anthropologie de Bourdieu (1972, 1980) sur le monde rural kabyle (Esquisse d’une théorie de la pratique, 1972, puis Le Sens pratique, 1980) et les interrogations sur le sens de l’expression « suivre une règle… ». Les remarques de Bourdieu sur la confusion entre « la règle comme hypothèse explicative formulée par le théoricien pour rendre compte de ce qu’il observe, et la règle comme principe qui gouverne réellement la pratique des agents concernés6 » donnent une clé pour la compréhension de la formation de l’objet « terres collectives » qui a fait couler tant d’encre dans le petit monde académique – et administratif – marocain depuis pratiquement le début du siècle. La théorie évolutionniste des formes de propriété, formulée par Maine et adoptée au début du XXe siècle par le grand juriste d’Alger spécialiste du droit musulman, Louis Milliot, qui fait passer les sociétés rurales par un certain nombre des stades aboutissant à la propriété privée, et dont la propriété collective était un stade intermédiaire (Milliot, 1922), fournissait le contexte idéologique de l’époque. Les réflexions de Bourdieu sur la logique de la modélisation en sciences sociales – que Bourdieu appelle le « juridisme » – qui consiste « à donner pour le principe de la pratique des agents la théorie que l’on doit construire pour en rendre raison » (Bourdieu, 1987:76) fournissait la clé épistémologique. Cette réflexion devrait faire partie du vade-mecum de tout chercheur se lançant dans des travaux de modélisation, formalisés ou non, en sciences sociales, que ce soit pour représenter des comportements, simuler la création de « règles » ou analyser des politiques.

Le retour sur un terrain démystifié par les lectures historiques et par les clés conceptuelles fournies par « Le Sens pratique » permettait de comprendre le sens du processus de re-traditionnalisation (voire simplement d’archaïsation), légitimé par un « référent pré-colonial » et mis en œuvre par des services politiques (d’abord coloniaux puis nationaux) fins connaisseurs des campagnes marocaines, qui poursuivaient des objectifs clairement politiques visant à contenir un colonisation spoliatrice « à l’algérienne »7, puis, après l’indépendance, à faire perdurer la figure du « Fellah marocain, défenseur du Trône »8. Avec les paysans du Bled Jmaâ du Gharb, qui aspiraient à sortir de leur statut prétendument « collectif » pour se voir reconnaître un statut légal de petits propriétaires terriens afin de sortir de l’arbitraire du partage administratif, devenu au fil du temps un instrument de clientélisme pour les autorités locales, on était loin d’un idéal « com-munautariste »9, figure qui commençait à se répandre dans la littérature, avant de toucher les organisations internationales, et d’y sévir sous la forme quasi-naturalisée du « CBNRM » (Community-Based Natural Resource Management).

Problèmes de sécurisation foncière en Afrique de l’Ouest

Au confluent des études foncières et de la gestion des ressources renouvelables

Le réseau « Enjeux fonciers en Afrique » (Le Bris et al, 1982) avaient forgé dans les années 1980 la notion de « référent pré-colonial », lequel regroupe idéalement le maximum d’attributs « archaïques » (égalitarisme, immuabilité, etc.) censés être le négatif exact des valeurs qu’on veut promouvoir : c’est ainsi qu’a été considéré le foncier traditionnel et le « collectivisme agraire » en Afrique. La notion explicite le biais du « juridisme » rencontrée dans la formation de l’objet « terres collectives » au Maroc, avec une « intentionnalité » pratique plus affirmée dans le cas du référent pré-colonial (promouvoir la dynamique de la propriété privée face à des structures archaïques et bloquées dans leurs traditions immuables)10.

L’irruption de l’anthropologie juridique dans l’analyse du foncier, que l’on doit, en France, à É. Le Roy, conduit la recherche à une meilleure prise en compte des représentations dans l’analyse du « rapport social entre les hommes à propos de la terre ». On va trouver cette dimension des représentations au cœur de l’ambiguïté du concept d’appropriation (rendre propre à un usage versus faire d’une chose un objet de propriété) et de la distinction chose/bien (une chose ne devient un bien que lorsqu’elle acquiert une valeur d’échange, à usage général et non spécifique) bien connu des juristes, mais un peu moins des économistes. Cet éclairage par les représentations, empêche d’adhérer pleinement aux théories néo-institutionnalistes d’E. Ostrom (1990), et au rôle instrumental qu’elle attribue aux « règles »11, résultat d’une rationalisation explicite des actions (ou d’un calcul implicite visant à réduire des coûts de transaction), alors que ses thèses font figure d’une des plus solides réfutations de Hardin et du « tout-propriété », mais qui se situent bien dans le cadre de l’individualisme méthodologique, même faible… Dans une illustration de l’apport de la théorie des choix publics à la gestion de l’environnement, E. et V. Ostrom (1977) insistent sur « the nature of the goods » pour définir, catégorisation désormais classique, les 4 types de « biens » (publics, privés, de club ou à péage, biens en commun ou common goods)12. Si ce découpage a pu considérablement aider les économistes néo-classiques à sortir d’une lecture dichotomique « privé/public », la référence à la nature des biens introduit une réduction des représentations possibles des ressources et de leurs usages. Pour schématiser, disons que la théorie des « choix publics » s’efforce d’établir d’abord, à partir de critères généralisables de consommation, la nature (publique, privée, collective, de « club »...) des biens, puis qu’elle cherche à identifier des critères de gestion adaptés à chaque type de biens ainsi identifié. On peut proposer une perspective légèrement différente : les représentations collectives fondent la « nature des biens », déterminent leur mode d’appropriation et de « gestion »13. L’exemple de la terre en Afrique, souvent objet de maîtrises superposées, variables dans le temps et selon l’identité du détenteur de la maîtrise (échelle de l’individu, de la famille, du lignage, etc.), pose un problème à la théorie des choix publics (à moins de décréter que la terre est un bien « privé par nature » et de prescrire des politiques de privatisation du foncier dans ce sens). Gabas et Hugon (2002) effectuent une démonstration similaire avec les « biens publics internationaux », en considérant que les biens communs ne peuvent être les mêmes selon les sociétés et qu’ « il existe des patrimoines communs dont la définition dépend des choix collectifs des citoyens ».

Les études foncières, délaissées depuis la fin des grands débats sur la réforme agraire, connaissaient un regain d’intérêt à la fin des années 1980, avec le développement de projets et programmes se préoccupant de la dégradation des agro-écosystèmes et de la préservation des ressources naturelles renouvelables. Le point commun de toutes ces opérations était la référence implicite à la thèse de Hardin (1968) qui prophétise la destruction des ressources communes par la surexploitation découlant de la pression démographique. D’où la recherche de formules juridiques et institutionnelles visant à généraliser l’appropriation (au sens de la privatisation) des espaces ruraux, afin de procurer plus de sécurité aux producteurs et les inciter à gérer sur le long terme leurs agro-écosystèmes. Parmi ces formules, la propriété privée de la terre est celle qui vient le plus facilement à l’esprit, tant elle semble familière aux concepteurs de tels programmes.
  1   2   3   4

similaire:

Règles, stratégies et contrats dans la problématique du foncier : théorie et pratiques à travers quelques terrains au Maghreb, en Afrique noire et à Madagascar iconMulhouse, le 12 décembre 2012
«l’économie du foncier» et ceci au travers d’un établissement régional du foncier ?

Règles, stratégies et contrats dans la problématique du foncier : théorie et pratiques à travers quelques terrains au Maghreb, en Afrique noire et à Madagascar iconEconomie / Afrique / Foncier
«dans les 35 pays africains étudiés, l’essentiel des terres agricoles a été confisqué par les Etats. Ce phénomène affecte 428 millions...

Règles, stratégies et contrats dans la problématique du foncier : théorie et pratiques à travers quelques terrains au Maghreb, en Afrique noire et à Madagascar iconRésumé : Pourquoi et comment un certain nombre de juristes américains...
«défini» la théorie financière effectivement mise en pratique par les financiers

Règles, stratégies et contrats dans la problématique du foncier : théorie et pratiques à travers quelques terrains au Maghreb, en Afrique noire et à Madagascar iconRésumé : Pourquoi et comment un certain nombre de juristes américains...
«défini» la théorie financière effectivement mise en pratique par les financiers

Règles, stratégies et contrats dans la problématique du foncier : théorie et pratiques à travers quelques terrains au Maghreb, en Afrique noire et à Madagascar iconL’allocation des risques dans les contrats : de l’économie des contrats...

Règles, stratégies et contrats dans la problématique du foncier : théorie et pratiques à travers quelques terrains au Maghreb, en Afrique noire et à Madagascar iconRésumé Les années 80 ont été marquées par l'émergence de la finance...
«secteur informel». Mais l’analyse de ces pratiques ne viendra qu’avec l’enquête menée au Niger par l’usaid et l’Université d’Etat...

Règles, stratégies et contrats dans la problématique du foncier : théorie et pratiques à travers quelques terrains au Maghreb, en Afrique noire et à Madagascar iconL'industrie du cacao secouée en Côte d'Ivoire
«pourriture noire» qui a touché le cacao de la Côte d’Ivoire», explique Sylvie Martin-Burellier, responsable des achats et de l’approvisionnement...

Règles, stratégies et contrats dans la problématique du foncier : théorie et pratiques à travers quelques terrains au Maghreb, en Afrique noire et à Madagascar iconTitres universitaires
«La problématique de la gestion des ressources externes dans la mise en œuvre des stratégies industrielles». Présentée le 26/01/2004....

Règles, stratégies et contrats dans la problématique du foncier : théorie et pratiques à travers quelques terrains au Maghreb, en Afrique noire et à Madagascar iconClimat : pourquoi la cop22 doit (vraiment) être la cop de l'Afrique
«l'atténuation aux effets du changement climatique et l'innovation en matière d'adaptation». La tenue de cet événement au Maroc,...

Règles, stratégies et contrats dans la problématique du foncier : théorie et pratiques à travers quelques terrains au Maghreb, en Afrique noire et à Madagascar iconQuelques sujets, leur problématique et un plan possible, à partir des annales du bac






Tous droits réservés. Copyright © 2016
contacts
e.20-bal.com